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  #1  
Old June 25th 08, 02:01 AM posted to alt.collecting.autographs
Sue H
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,413
Default Baseball question

I was wondering about what would ruin a value of a baseball.

I got an official ball signed by Bill Buckner and then today I almost
brought it and got Lee Smith to sign it as they played together
briefly (I think one season).

What constitues a better thing: two separate balls, a ball with
players all from the same team (and do they have to be same year(s),
Or is it bad to get someone of lesser known status on a ball with
someone of a more major status?

I ended up not bringing the ball as I thought perhaps Buckner was best
left on that alone (unless I can get a couple major names from the
year the ball went between his legs). Thoughts?

My question makes me wonder about music graphs too. So say I got some
70's-80's band signatures but later on they have new band members. If
I had say a generic item like a pickguard or drum head, would it be
good to get the other sigs, or leave it to the ORIGINAL members? I
would think getting a CD or photo signed which a new member was not
part of would not be cool, but not sure about more generic things.
Opinion?
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  #2  
Old June 25th 08, 02:23 AM posted to alt.collecting.autographs
Gummby3[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 237
Default Baseball question

Honestly, I personally don't see a problem with it. As you know,
you're getting the autograph for you, first and foremost. Get the
autographs that make you happy. If you ever do sell the item, the
person will most likely buy it based on one of the autographs. If the
person isn't interested because it's multi-signed, there's always
another potential buyer somewhere down the road that won't be as
picky. :-)

--


Mike
Gummby3
-= Star Collector =-
www.star-collector.net
Celebrity addresses the way they should be - free.


"Sue H" wrote in message
...
I was wondering about what would ruin a value of a baseball.

I got an official ball signed by Bill Buckner and then today I
almost
brought it and got Lee Smith to sign it as they played together
briefly (I think one season).

What constitues a better thing: two separate balls, a ball with
players all from the same team (and do they have to be same year(s),
Or is it bad to get someone of lesser known status on a ball with
someone of a more major status?

I ended up not bringing the ball as I thought perhaps Buckner was
best
left on that alone (unless I can get a couple major names from the
year the ball went between his legs). Thoughts?

My question makes me wonder about music graphs too. So say I got
some
70's-80's band signatures but later on they have new band members.
If
I had say a generic item like a pickguard or drum head, would it be
good to get the other sigs, or leave it to the ORIGINAL members? I
would think getting a CD or photo signed which a new member was not
part of would not be cool, but not sure about more generic things.
Opinion?



  #3  
Old June 25th 08, 03:12 AM posted to alt.collecting.autographs
Sue H
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,413
Default Baseball question

Tis True I guess. However, I have been delving into financial stuff
lately and my mind is geared towards the best investment. But like
you say, I've not sold much of my stuff over the whole course of
collecting (1%-3% max I would guess and those were extras or trades
mainly). But I still want the coolest items... the better quality
baseballs/jerseys, etc on some items. On my extras, crew etc not so
much worried, but on a few things, I want a few nice things...

On Tue, 24 Jun 2008 20:23:54 -0500, "Gummby3"
wrote:

Honestly, I personally don't see a problem with it. As you know,
you're getting the autograph for you, first and foremost. Get the
autographs that make you happy. If you ever do sell the item, the
person will most likely buy it based on one of the autographs. If the
person isn't interested because it's multi-signed, there's always
another potential buyer somewhere down the road that won't be as
picky. :-)


  #4  
Old June 25th 08, 08:14 AM posted to alt.collecting.autographs
Arnold Quarry
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 32
Default Baseball question

single-signed on the sweetspot....one player per ball

"Sue H" wrote in message
...
I was wondering about what would ruin a value of a baseball.

I got an official ball signed by Bill Buckner and then today I almost
brought it and got Lee Smith to sign it as they played together
briefly (I think one season).

What constitues a better thing: two separate balls, a ball with
players all from the same team (and do they have to be same year(s),
Or is it bad to get someone of lesser known status on a ball with
someone of a more major status?

I ended up not bringing the ball as I thought perhaps Buckner was best
left on that alone (unless I can get a couple major names from the
year the ball went between his legs). Thoughts?

My question makes me wonder about music graphs too. So say I got some
70's-80's band signatures but later on they have new band members. If
I had say a generic item like a pickguard or drum head, would it be
good to get the other sigs, or leave it to the ORIGINAL members? I
would think getting a CD or photo signed which a new member was not
part of would not be cool, but not sure about more generic things.
Opinion?



  #5  
Old June 25th 08, 09:51 PM posted to alt.collecting.autographs
pe2[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 196
Default Baseball question

Yeah, sue.

it is better to have a player sign on the sweet spot, one per ball as the
previous poster said.

I have a Bart Giamatti Ball signed by Pete Rose on the sweet spot, but I
made the mistake of adding Rose Jr. to the ball. It's a nice item, but Rose
Jr., drops the value of this ball signicantally. The ball with Rose alone is
in the $60 range.


  #6  
Old June 25th 08, 10:56 PM posted to alt.collecting.autographs
Sue H
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,413
Default Baseball question

That sounds reasonable. It's a hard thing to know sometimes. I would
guess exceptions would be world series multiple signed etc. like a
Yankee Babe Ruth on a sweet spot verses a team signed ball; the team
ball would be worth more etc.

On Wed, 25 Jun 2008 16:51:38 -0400, "pe2"
wrote:

Yeah, sue.

it is better to have a player sign on the sweet spot, one per ball as the
previous poster said.

I have a Bart Giamatti Ball signed by Pete Rose on the sweet spot, but I
made the mistake of adding Rose Jr. to the ball. It's a nice item, but Rose
Jr., drops the value of this ball signicantally. The ball with Rose alone is
in the $60 range.


  #7  
Old June 26th 08, 03:30 AM posted to alt.collecting.autographs
Sue H
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,413
Default Baseball question

Wow; that sounds counter intuitive since Gehrig is huge too... would
condition have affected that? And didn't Babe sign a TON of balls? I
do remember a roadshow where they said there were a lot of "clubhouse"
sigs (signed by ball boys or something like that).

On Wed, 25 Jun 2008 22:06:37 -0700, "Arnold Quarry"
wrote:

"Sue H" wrote in message
.. .
like a
Yankee Babe Ruth on a sweet spot verses a team signed ball; the team
ball would be worth more etc.


nope, Babe Ruth signed near mint ball = $60,000

Yankees team signed near mint ball with Ruth & Gehrig = $30,000

single signed Ruth is always worth more than Yankees team signed with Ruth


  #8  
Old June 26th 08, 06:06 AM posted to alt.collecting.autographs
Arnold Quarry
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 32
Default Baseball question

"Sue H" wrote in message
...
like a
Yankee Babe Ruth on a sweet spot verses a team signed ball; the team
ball would be worth more etc.


nope, Babe Ruth signed near mint ball = $60,000

Yankees team signed near mint ball with Ruth & Gehrig = $30,000

single signed Ruth is always worth more than Yankees team signed with Ruth


  #9  
Old June 27th 08, 02:45 AM posted to alt.collecting.autographs
KC
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 59
Default Baseball question

Neat question. I have a simalar issue. I got Glen Anderson on an Anderson
#9 Oiler jersey. Of course he was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame 2
weeks ago. But I got Bernie Nichols on the #9 as well. Drops the value but
Nichols was #9 right after Anderson left the team. Cool jersey but has both
autos.
"Sue H" wrote in message
...
I was wondering about what would ruin a value of a baseball.

I got an official ball signed by Bill Buckner and then today I almost
brought it and got Lee Smith to sign it as they played together
briefly (I think one season).

What constitues a better thing: two separate balls, a ball with
players all from the same team (and do they have to be same year(s),
Or is it bad to get someone of lesser known status on a ball with
someone of a more major status?

I ended up not bringing the ball as I thought perhaps Buckner was best
left on that alone (unless I can get a couple major names from the
year the ball went between his legs). Thoughts?

My question makes me wonder about music graphs too. So say I got some
70's-80's band signatures but later on they have new band members. If
I had say a generic item like a pickguard or drum head, would it be
good to get the other sigs, or leave it to the ORIGINAL members? I
would think getting a CD or photo signed which a new member was not
part of would not be cool, but not sure about more generic things.
Opinion?



  #10  
Old June 27th 08, 03:05 AM posted to alt.collecting.autographs
Arnold Quarry
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 32
Default Baseball question

"Sue H" wrote in message
...
Wow; that sounds counter intuitive


I was wrong. A near mint Babe Ruth single signed sold for about $150,000 in
2005 and here is a link to a similar one that was going up for auction last
month, expected to go for even more than that.

http://www.memorylaneinc.com/carvellincoln.html

Single signed Lou Gehrig balls in near mint go for over $50,000. This one
was sold last year:

http://www.scpauctions.com/html/auct...7postsale.html

The most a 1927 Yankees team signed ball ever sold for was $37,000 in near
mint condition and it had Ruth and Gehrig on it along with the rest of the
team.

There are many other examples of a single player on a ball selling for more
than the entire team. A Clemente signed ball would sell for more in the
same condition than a Pirates team signed ball with Clemente.



 




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